Peter Tosh Tour Date Registry Update plus Interview (Boston, 1976)

MIDNIGHT RAVER BLOG and TOSH TOUR DATE REGISTRY contributor Andreas von der Heide documented the following unknown dates recently:
1979 FEBRUARY 1 UCD COFFEEHOUSE, UNIV. OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS, USA
1978 NOVEMBER 27 PARADISO AMSTERDAM NETHERLANDS (DATE CHANGE)
1982-xx-xx (1982-08-01?) ALOHA STADIUM, HONOLULU, HI, USA (with Oingo Boingo)
1981 JUNE 18 2ND VIENNA FOLK FESTIVAL, DONAUINSEL, WIEN, VIENNA, AUSTRIA
1983 AUGUST 21 SANTA BARBARA COUNTY BOWL, SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA, USA
1979 JUNE 12 WIENER STADTHALLE, WIEN (VIENNA), AUSTRIA
1983 AUGUST 29 PARAMOUNT THEATER, PORTLAND, OREGON, USA (WITH BILLY RANCHER)
1982 OCTOBER 7 THE ROXY, HOLLYWOOD, L.A., CA, USA (WILLIN PROPHETS AS OPENER)
1981 OCTOBER 8 CENTER STAGE, EAST PROVIDENCE, RI, USA
1981 JULY 28 THE RITZ, NYC, NY, USA
1981 JULY 29 THE RITZ, NYC, NY, USA
1981 SEPTEMBER 27 THE RITZ, NYC, NY, USA
1981 SEPTEMBER 27 THE RITZ, NYC, NY, USA
1979 MARCH 1 PAINESVILLE AGORA, PAINESVILLE, OH, USA
1982 OCTOBER 27 AGORA BALLROOM, ATLANTA, GA, USA
1982-XX-XX FINE ARTS CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, MA, USA
1978 JULY 9 THE CABOZEE, MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA
1982 OCTOBER 23 REGGAE FESTIVAL, WINTERGARDEN, DALLAS, TEXAS, USA (WITH JIMMY CLIFF) –
1981-SEPTEMBER 4 CENTENNIAL CONCERT HALL, WINNIPEG, CANADA
1979 JUNE 16 NEUE WELT, BERLIN, GERMANY
1982 OCTOBER 30 SUNRISE MUSICAL THEATER, SUNRISE, FLORIDA, USA (WITH UP FRONT)
1982 OCTOBER 28 JAI ALAI FRONTON HALL, TAMPA, FL, USA (WITH NEW BREED BAND)
1976 OCTOBER 22 IRVINE AUDITORIUM, UNIV. OF PENNSYLVANIA,
1976 OCTOBER MIAMI, FL USA” IS “UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI”
BECK AND HAMMER, OUTDOORS IN STRATFORD CONN, 76
1976-XX-XX – PLAYER’S TAVERN, WESTPORT, CT, USA
1979 FEBRUARY 27 PALMS, MILWAUKEE, WI, USA
1979 FEBRUARY 26 THUMPERS, MINNEAPOLIS, MN, USA

72438

67779

noname

Photo courtesy of Lee Jaffe (www.leejaffe.com)

University of Miami, 1976.  Photo courtesy of Lee Jaffe (www.leejaffe.com)

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Also obtained a ticket, program, and what looks to be a video still from Tosh’s performance at the Monterey Tribal Stomp on September 8, 1979.

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The following interview article titled ‘Reggae, like the heartbeat,” gives a positive message’ was written by Kay Bourne and appeared in the Bay State Banner on June 9, 1977.
“It’s wool against wool,” says Peter Tosh about the seaman’s cap‑like tam he was wearing pulled down over his dread‑locks, which still permitted room enough for the dread‑locks to hang about his face and protrude slightly through a hole in the top of the tam.
The colors of the tam have a significance, as does much of what Jamaican reggae singer Tosh gets next to.
The tam is basically blue with narrow stripes of red, gold, and green. It’s the stripes that have the message.
“What colors do you see when you come to a stop light?” asks the pedagogically‑minded Tosh. “The stop lights were invented by a black man. The colors are a rainbow. Red for blood. Gold for the resources of the earth. Green for the fertile field.” As to the “wool” that is the dread‑locks, Tosh says that he washes his hair with herbal shampoo about three times a weeks, but he doesn’t put anything like a rinse or cream into his hair to wind the curls up or to make them stick out as they do. He says that his hair is the way it is because he has “high potential magnetic fields.”
It comes as no surprise to the person who’s talked with Tosh socially to discover his music is teaching too.
The lyrics of reggae music are political, not nonsensical like, “she done him wrong” or “he done me wrong.”
A listener can dance to reggae music; but while they dance they get a positive message.
The beat is not contradictory to the purpose of the lyrics. It’s a ritual beat that takes those who hear it all the way back to what LeRoy Jones calls “ingram” ‑‑ stored knowledge from the ancestors. The reggae beat is suggestive of the kind of movements that that bring a person up from under devastating hardships.
In America reggae has a popularity too because for most Americans it is a new sound which comes along at a time when rock seems to have depleted its inventiveness. Americans take to what seems different.
Tosh, however, instructs that “reggae is like the heartbeat.”
“If the person has not heard it before that is because it was plucked from the mentality like everything made to enlighten people was held back and made illegal and unlawful.”
Guitarist‑vocalist Peter Tosh writes his own reggae songs. When he was with the Wailers, for instance, they did his “One Foundation” and a song he wrote with Bob Marley, “Get up, Stand up” on their “Burnin'” album.
Tosh’s own album “Equal Rights” (Columbia) all eight songs are his.
“I write from inspiration,” says Tosh.
He describes the experience as, “the inspiration doesn’t stray; it doesn’t tary. It passes through the creator. It’s you to know how to reproduce it to satisfy.”
Tosh writes about people who call themselves Africans who are born elsewhere. “African is born everywhere else, if you are black,” he says.
He writes about his country, about which he is patriotic as are so many Jamaicans.
Like many other Third World countries Jamaica has a lot of umemployment and a lot poverty.
Tosh says that he has written, “some very, very heavy songs about Jamaica because I want everyone to know what Jamaica is, not as it is propagandized. It is the best West Indian place.”
Tosh adds, “I’m watching the new administration and haven’t released these songs.”
Many listeners enjoy the way Tosh puts things in his songs. Jamaicans speak English, but they often use words differently than do. Americans. The Jamaican flavor added to the writer’s knack for conveying his own voice makes Tosh’s political sentiments bristle in a unique way for the listener.
“Downpressor Man,” for example, is a version of the American folk song and spiritual “Oh, Sinner Man.” If an American had written the lyric it would likely to have come out “Oppresser Man.”
Street people should appreciate Tosh’s “Stepping Razor.” And although they probably wouldn’t have put it the way Tosh does, they will understand such lyrics as, “I’m like a stepping razor. Don’t you watch my size. I’m dangerous…..if you want to live, treat me good.”
Tosh’s song titles do not mislead. “Equal Rights,” “African,” “Apartheid” are about what they say they are about.
Reggae music has not taken all of America by storm; but it has established a base of popularity in the urban communities where there is a large contigent of Jamaicans. The most prominent cities are New York, San Francisco, L.A., Miami, Philadelphia, Boston, Indianpolis, Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, and Atlanta.
College campuses are supportive of reggae music too. Those fans were birthed by the popularity of the film “The Harder They Come,” which is said to have opened minds and eyes to Jamaican culture.
Tosh comments, “well, (the growth of reggae music’s popularity) moving slowly, but surely. The people are beginning to respond very much, especially black Americans.”

2 thoughts on “Peter Tosh Tour Date Registry Update plus Interview (Boston, 1976)

  1. Pingback: Peter Tosh “Equal Rights” Amsterdam, June, 1981 | Midnight Raver

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