Record Shopping at Rockers! (Sevens Clash Blog)

I’ve still got a strong Rockers vibe so we will go with it for a while.  I discovered an excellent piece on a blog called ‘Sevens Clash’ that is really worth sharing here.

RECORD SHOPPING AT ROCKERS INTERNATIONAL

The history of Jamaican popular music converges on Orange Street. Its function as a principal artery carrying traffic north from Ocean Boulevard up to Cross Roads — the de facto boundary between downtown and uptown Kingston — makes it a locus of activity. Known locally as Beat Street, the record stores and small studios that began to line the thoroughfare during the prosperous post-war years transformed it into an important music corridor. Overlapping layers of music history spanning genres and generations unfold along almost any stretch of the strip. At the height of the ska era, Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry conducted his infamous Sunday afternoon Studio One auditions out of Coxson Dodd’s Music City at the corner of Orange and Beeston Street, a couple blocks from the childhood home of future Crown Prince of Reggae, Dennis Brown. In later years, aspiring musicians congregated one short block to the east at the Idler’s Rest, an outdoor gathering place on Chancery Lane where a draw of herb could be enjoyed in peace and you could be easily reached to record. Like a musical Galapagos, Orange Street and its environs operated as a self-contained eco-system incubating the evolution of the nation’s nascent music industry.
Introducing the world to his signature “Far East Sound” — an ethereal, melodica-laced, minor-key nod to the Jackie Mittoo-era Studio One — Augustus Pablo made his name as a talented multi-instrumentalist with the hit track “Java” in 1971, a flood of classic singles throughout the early seventies, and a popular debut album, This is Augustus Pablo, in 1974.
CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING AT ‘SEVENS CLASH’…
SEVENS CLASH TOOK TONS OF AMAZING PHOTOS AT ROCKERS.  HERE ARE TWO OF THEM.